Faculty Spotlight: Sarah Davis, DO

  Dr. Sarah Davis serves as an Assistant Professor of Osteopathic Principals and Practices (OPP) at ICOM. She graduated from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2004, and completed her family medicine residency at St. John Oakland Hospital in Madison Heights, Michigan. After completing her residency, Dr. Davis joined a family medicine/athletic medicine practice in Detroit, Michigan, where she practiced for two years. She then moved to Denver, Colorado, where she continued to practice family medicine at Kaiser Permanente. Dr. Davis is board certified in Integrative Medicine, Family Medicine and Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine. 

Dr. Sarah Davis serves as an Assistant Professor of Osteopathic Principals and Practices (OPP) at ICOM. She graduated from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2004, and completed her family medicine residency at St. John Oakland Hospital in Madison Heights, Michigan. After completing her residency, Dr. Davis joined a family medicine/athletic medicine practice in Detroit, Michigan, where she practiced for two years. She then moved to Denver, Colorado, where she continued to practice family medicine at Kaiser Permanente. Dr. Davis is board certified in Integrative Medicine, Family Medicine and Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine. 

Q: What inspired you to pursue a career in osteopathic medicine? 

A: During my undergraduate career at Michigan State University, I was the president of the Preprofessional Society; and once a year, guest speakers from the health care industry would come and talk with us. The representative from the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine visited us and discussed what a DO was, and when I learned about the tenants of osteopathic medicine, it resonated with me. I believe that’s how we should be treating patients — the body being a unit of mind, body and spirit, and looking at the patient as a whole. 

Q: How did you discover your love of teaching? 

A: Throughout my career, I toyed with pursuing the neuromusculoskeletal certification, and the opportunity to achieve that presented itself in 2016. During my Neuromusculoskeletal Medicine Plus One residency, part of my responsibilities included teaching first and second year students in the medical school, as well as third and fourth year students during their hospital rotations. It was fun being with the students and I enjoyed developing relationships with them and answering their questions. Being a mentor for them was the piece I really enjoyed. 

Q: Why did you choose to come to ICOM?

A: I heard about Boise on a Facebook group for physician moms, and a lot of the women were talking about how great of a place it is to raise a family; so I started exploring the area and heard about the development of ICOM in Meridian. We came out to visit and I loved the leadership and the environment they wanted to create — they felt strongly about incorporating OPP across the curriculum. It seemed like a great place to work, especially with a state-of-the-art facility. ICOM is truly designed to train the physicians of the future and I’m happy to play a role in that. 

Q: Are you excited to work in the OPP Lab? 

A: It’s a beautiful lab with plenty of natural sunlight, so it will be a great environment in which to teach and learn. It’ll be really fun to see the students start to palpate things and really start to comprehend what they’re feeling, using osteopathic manipulative treatment, within the musculoskeletal system; and then when they start to see success with some of the treatments that they’ll do. That’s really exciting to see when you’re teaching. 

Q: Do you have any advice for incoming students?

A: Don’t be afraid to approach your professors. We’re here to teach you, we want you to learn, take advantage of the time that you have with your professors. Always be willing to ask questions because that’s what we’re here for. 

Q: What are you looking forward to the most during ICOM’s inaugural year?

A: It will be really interesting to see how the incoming student body, the inaugural class, molds the culture. It’ll be exciting to see all of our hard work come alive in terms of the curriculum we’ve been developing…all of this behind-the-scenes work is finally coming to fruition. I want students to be proud of being osteopathic physicians and this is the beginning of that journey for them.